Garrison-based soldier killed in bomb blast

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An Edmonton-based soldier killed in Afghanistan over the weekend was inspired into military service by his grandfather.

Pte. Tyler William Todd, 26, was serving with the First Battalion of the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) based out of Edmonton Garrison.

Todd was killed when a roadside bomb detonated while he was walking near the town of Belanday in the Dand district of Afghanistan, about eight kilometres southwest of Kandahar.

The explosion happened around 7:30 a.m. in Kandahar on Saturday and also injured another soldier patrolling with Todd.

In a statement released on Tuesday, Todd’s family said he had been inspired by his grandfather’s military service and felt compelled to join the military.

“As a child Tyler would dress in his grandfather’s uniform, his need to join the army was inspired by his grandfather John William Todd.”

His family described Todd as outgoing and said he would be deeply missed.

“Tyler was a very beloved son who was outgoing, adventurous and never missed an opportunity to put a smile on someone’s face.”

Todd was part of a rotation of soldiers that left for Afghanistan last fall from Edmonton Garrison. He had been in the country for about six months and was coming to the end of his tour.

His family said Todd left a big impact on those he left behind.

“Although his life was much too short he touched the lives of many. Tyler will be truly missed by all that knew him. He will never be forgotten and always in our hearts and prayers.”

He had joined the army in October, 2007 and was on his first tour of Afghanistan.

A ramp ceremony was held on Sunday at the base in Kandahar and funeral arrangements are expected to be announced later this week.

Todd grew up on a family farm in Bright, Ont., near Kitchener. He is the 142nd Canadian soldier to be killed in Afghanistan.

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